WATCH: Girls Aloud singer Nadine Coyle unveils art installation from Northern Ireland made up of 636 national lottery balls



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The Londonderry singer has revealed the artwork commissioned by the Antrim Castle Gardens Lottery, which aims to inspire change and encourage audiences to think about how they could use some of the $ 30 million pounds sterling raised for good causes every week in their own communities.

The installation in Northern Ireland is the second of four works of art the National Lottery plans to unveil this week across the UK as part of its 27th anniversary celebrations.

When seen facing the balls, spell out the word “DREAMS” and, from another angle, they form a question mark.

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Nadine Coyle partners with The National Lottery to unveil a striking installation in Castle Gardens, Antrim, to encourage the nation to think about how it could use some of the £ 30million raised for good causes every week in their own communities. Photo by Charles McQuillan / Getty Images for the National Lottery

When the four pieces are revealed, they will read the message “BUILD DREAMS, CREATE CHANGE”.

The ex-Girls Aloud singer, 36, said: “As I performed in venues across the UK throughout my career, I have been able to really feel the impactful changes that funding the National Lottery can create for so many individuals and organizations in the music industry.

“The arts have always had the ability to connect you with people, to give you confidence and to nurture your creativity.

“And so, celebrating this funding that identifies and supports local community projects to inspire and include future generations is something close to my heart. “

The facility is made up of over 636 national lottery balls to represent the 636,000 projects that have been supported over the past 27 years. Photo by Charles McQuillan / Getty Images for the National Lottery

Each installation was made from more than 636 national lottery balls, which represent the 636,000 and more organizations that receive funding in the sports, arts, heritage and community sectors.

The Northern Ireland installation will be on view through Sunday, with other installations popping up in Edinburgh’s Royal Botanic Garden, Cardiff’s Wales Millennium Center and London’s Trafalgar Square.

The Mayor of Antrim and Newtownabbey, Councilor Billy Webb, said: “I am delighted that the National Lottery has chosen the beautiful gardens of Antrim Castle as the location in Northern Ireland to present this magnificent work of art.

“We share a mutual passion to help improve our local communities and support the panoply of good causes across the borough.

Ros Kerslake, Managing Director of the National Lottery Heritage Fund and Chairman of the National Lottery Forum, said: “With £ 30million raised for good causes every week, we have grants available of £ 3,000-5million.

“By coming together as communities and as a nation, we can build, dream and create to change our future for the better and for generations to come. “

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