The National Transport Authority does not want ride-sharing taxis such as Lyft and Uber in Ireland despite taxi shortages


The National Transport Authority does not want ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft to be introduced in Ireland.

It comes despite claims by Leo Varadkar that they could help solve Dublin’s taxi shortage.

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Leo Varadkar says ridesharing services could help solve Dublin’s taxi shortage.
The NTA has told The Irish Sun that private car hire services should not be opened here as it could undermine the regulated taxi sector

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The NTA has told The Irish Sun that private car hire services should not be opened here as it could undermine the regulated taxi sector

The Irish Sun can reveal that the NTA is instead looking to increase the number of 24-hour bus services in the capital to solve transport chaos in the city center and at Dublin Airport.

Earlier this week, Tanaiste Leo Varadkar told The Irish Sun that ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft should be ‘freed up’ in Ireland to address the shortage of taxis.

Uber and Lyft already operate here, but drivers must have a registered taxi license.

But the NTA told The Irish Sun such private car hire services should not be opened here as it could undermine the regulated taxi sector.

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The National Private Hire and Taxi Association also criticized Tanaiste’s calls for ride-sharing apps.

Jim Waldron of the NPH&TA told us, “If you want unchecked people, then go for it. But be careful what you ask for. It’s very dangerous and when a tragedy happens, people will ask who let it happen?

“You need a regulated industry and that’s what we have right now.”

Meanwhile, in March, taxi drivers warned that even tripling the number of taxis on the roads during weekend “crazy hours” would do nothing to alleviate the phenomenal post-pandemic demand.

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Hour-long waits at taxi ranks in Dublin city center are common as trams and trains end before the rush, sparking safety fears as people are often forced to walk home .

On the busiest weekend nights, punters attempt to hail eight taxis per second.

Taxi driver Alan Cooley told The Irish Sun: “Everyone is dumped at the same time.

“You see thousands of people on a Friday or Saturday night getting thrown out on the road.

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“It comes back to the fact that the closing times are all at the same time. It’s a recipe for disaster.

“It doesn’t matter if you have to put three times the amount of the taxi fleet there, for those two or three hours, it’s just pandemonium.”

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